A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Stateline: Desperate for affordable housing, some cities sweeten tax breaks for developers

By Robbie Sequeira Stateline Last month, city council members in Fort Worth, Texas, decided developers that received massive tax breaks to build affordable housing would no longer be able to buy their way out of the obligation by paying a $200 annual fee in lieu of each unbuilt low-income unit. In Columbus, Ohio, leaders voted in December to expand the city’s tax break program for affordable housing....

KY Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources using new technology resource to monitor state’s wildlife

Researchers with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources have a new resource to aid in ongoing efforts to track and conserve wildlife. With the participation of key partners, wildlife biologists have installed three Motus Wildlife Tracking System stations in Kentucky since January 2023. The Motus system is an international network of researchers that use automated radio telemetry to...

New research shows non-hunters overwhelmingly support Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Program

Recent research finds that 86 percent of firearm owners and sport shooters who do not hunt support the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Program, which uses revenues from a tax on firearms, ammunition, and archery equipment to fund wildlife conservation efforts carried out by state fish and wildlife agencies across the country. When the Federal Aid legislation was passed in 1937, most of the people...

KY Rep. Josh Branscum discusses how state is addressing data privacy, deep fakes in elections

By Jaqueline Pitts Kentucky Chamber of Commerce How companies collect and process online user data has been an increasingly hot topic among state legislatures in recent years, and Kentucky is no different. In 2023, a bill dealing with data privacy passed the state Senate but did not receive approval from the House. That bill was opposed by the Kentucky Chamber because it would have created new and...

Louisville public health offices warn of uptick in measles cases; vaccines are available

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today Officials with the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness (LMPHW) are warning that the number of measles cases are rising, putting those who have not been immunized in danger of contracting the illness. They note that in late 2022, an outbreak of measles sickened 85 children in Columbus, Ohio, sending more than 40% of them to the hospital. In recent weeks,...

As Cameron left, his office agreed to pay nearly $100k settlement to settle open records lawsuit

By Deborah Yetter The Kentucky Lantern Former Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s office agreed to pay $99,750 to settle a long-running open records dispute in December just days before Cameron left to become CEO of an organization devoted to combatting “woke capitalism,” among other objectives. Daniel Cameron American Oversight, an open records advocacy group based in Washington D.C.,...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Some of Kentucky’s best sauger fishing of the year starts in February

The thermometer might say no, but the calendar says yes. February is the start of some of the best fishing of the year for sauger in Kentucky rivers and tailwaters. Water temperatures will be cold, but the fishing can be good to excellent, when water conditions are right. Sauger readily bite in water temperatures below 40 degrees F. Kentucky has six rivers that support quality sauger fisheries (Photo...

Kentucky man sentenced to 30 months in federal prison after pleading guilty to role in Capitol riots

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today A Kentucky man has been sentenced to 30 months in federal prison following by three years of supervised release after pleading guilty to charges stemming from his role in the breach of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Clayton Ray Mullins, 54, of Magnolia, was sentenced at U.S. District Court in Washington for assaulting law enforcement during the Capitol breach, according...

Experts say Kentucky drinking water and wetlands at risk due to recent rollbacks in federal protections

By Nadia Ramlagan Public News Service Kentucky has rapidly lost its wetlands over the past few decades, and advocates say the recent gutting of federal protections for marshes and other ecosystems saturated by water could imperil local drinking water quality. Michael Washburn, executive director of the Kentucky Waterways Alliance, explained wetlands provide natural large-scale water filtration, serve...

Legislative briefs: Kenton County representatives take on new assignments; Sen. Schickel honored

Kimberly Moser Rep. Kimberly Poore Moser of Taylor Mill will serve as a member of the House Standing Committee on Transportation, according to an announcement from the office of House Speaker David Osborne. “I’m honored to serve in this role and look forward to working with my colleagues and other stakeholders. Investing in our roads, bridges, and transportation are direct investments into our...

When school’s out, Cincinnati Museum Center offers variety of camps for kids, including several sessions at NKU

When school is out, camps are in. It doesn’t look like it outside, but summer is fast approaching and a houseful of energized kids is coming with it. But don’t worry, Cincinnati Museum Center (CMC) has you covered. Cooking classes (File photo) CMC’s Museum Camps are the perfect cure for summertime boredom, blues and brain drain. Camps go on sale for CMC Members February 1 and for non-Members...

Bluegrass Wildlife: Karlee Peeler participates in pageants to educate people about the environment

By Howard Whiteman Murray State University There is a lot of gloom and doom in this world, but there are also many bright spots. Karlee Peeler, from Farmington, is one of those bright spots. You could say Karlee is different from most high school sophomores. She likes snakes, but also competes in pageants. Imagine that? She uses the pageants to help educate people about snakes, pollinators, and other...

KY Senate Transportation Chair Jimmy Higdon addresses ongoing issues with KAVIS updates

Senate Transportation Committee Chair Jimmy Higdon, R-Lebanon, on Friday addressed the Kentucky state Senate chamber regarding the ongoing challenges faced by county clerks’ offices across Kentucky since the implementation of the Kentucky Automated Vehicle Information System (KAVIS). Higdon, recognizing the significance of these issues, emphasized the importance of patience from constituents...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: The American coot is an infrequent visitor to lakes in Central Kentucky

This migratory waterbird is an infrequent visitor to lakes in central Kentucky during the winter months. Commonly mistaken for a duck, the American coot (fulica americana) is in fact a bird of the family rallidae, which includes rails, gallinules, and coots. The common name is mud hen. The American coot found its niche in sports culture as the mascot of the Toledo Mud Hens, a minor league baseball...

Kentucky’s Appalachian teachers say ‘intense’ challenges lie ahead for education in the region

By Nadia Ramlagan Public News Service Educators in Appalachian Kentucky said significant school disruption and remote learning during the COVID pandemic combined with the devastating flooding in the summer of 2022 have caused major education setbacks in the region, according to a recent survey. More than 70% of teachers said their schools lack adequate tools to address the ongoing drug epidemic and...